Kroger puts limits on children’s flu meds, pain relievers as cases rise amid Biden’s ongoing supply chain crisis

Kroger puts limits on children's flu meds, pain relievers as cases rise amid Biden's ongoing supply chain crisis

Image: Kroger puts limits on children’s flu meds, pain relievers as cases rise amid Biden’s ongoing supply chain crisis

(Natural News) If Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg was a Republican and he worked for the administration, he would be getting questions daily about why, after nearly two years in office, the country is continuing to experience shortages of key consumer products.

He would be asked what he is doing to negate the ongoing baby formula shortage, the dearth of building supplies, and now, shortages of children’s flu medicine and pain relievers as cases rise dramatically around the country. The fact that he’s not, of course, is more an indictment of our lousy left-wing press, which found fault with every breath Donald took but somehow can’t seem to find anything the regime is doing wrong.

But the regime’s inability — or refusal — to tackle the supply problems has led retailers to take action on their own. Kroger’s grocery chain, for instance, announced this week that, at the height of season, the chain is limiting purchases of children’s flu and pain meds because they can’t get enough of a supply.

“The U.S. grocer has asked customers to limit their purchase to two pediatric pain medications and four cold and items, a company spokesperson” told Reuters, the outlet reported.

The newswire noted further:

Kroger joins pharmacy chains CVS Health Corp and Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc, which have also limited purchases of children’s pain medicines at a time when U.S. hospitalizations have jumped to the highest in a decade for this time of year.

CVS currently has a two-product limit on all children’s pain-relief products at its pharmacy locations and online, while Walgreens had put a limit of six over-the-counter pediatric fever reducers per online transaction.

Brighteon.TV

Meanwhile, the baby formula shortage is now entering its second year after the regime claimed to have tackled the problem in May. At the time, “Biden invoked the Defense Production Act to speed production of infant formula and authorized flights to import supply from overseas, as he faces mounting political pressure over a domestic shortage caused by the safety-related closure of the country’s largest formula manufacturing plant,” according to the Christian Science Monitor.

“The Defense Production Act order requires suppliers of formula manufacturers to fulfill orders from those companies before other customers, in an effort to eliminate production bottlenecks. Mr. is also authorizing the Defense Department to use commercial aircraft to fly formula supplies that meet federal standards from overseas to the United States, in what the is calling ‘Operation Fly Formula,’” the report noted further.

Then why is the issue persisting?

“Nearly one year has passed since the baby formula shortage began impacting America’s kids and parents — and the issue may not end this year,” Fox News reported Dec. 9, adding: “A new report by Reckitt Benckiser, the maker of Enfamil, indicates shortages are expected to persist until at least the spring of 2023.”

The outlet interviewed one mother of four from Louisiana, Amber Bergeron, who confirmed that it has been extremely difficult to feed her eight-month-old twins because she has difficulty, still, finding formula for them.

What’s more, she doesn’t see the situation ending anytime soon. “I’m beyond struggling,” she told the outlet in a recent interview, adding that she has had to fight to get them fed their entire lives so far.

WATCH:

Earlier this month, she said she was down to her last half-can of formula and could not find it in stores anywhere locally — or elsewhere.

“I went to multiple stores, I contacted family, I contacted friends out of town,” she told the network. “I did the best that I could.”

She finally connected with someone on Facebook who had what she needed, but it was close. “It came down to half a can of formula — and with twins, that doesn’t last very long,” she said.

“I just don’t see how the children, our future, is not something that they can prioritize,” she noted of the regime.

Fox News went on to report that the last Operation Fly Formula flight took place in September.

Sources include:

FoxNews.com

CSMonitor.com

Finance.Yahoo.com